Who Are The Revolutionary Women?

What is the YPJ?

Who are the women of the YPJ? How was the YPJ formed? What does it fight for? Learn the answers to these questions and more in this short documentary by the YPG Press Office.  

Şoreşa Jin

Şoreşa Jin is a short documentary that shows how women in Rojava have organized their own communities to institutionalize women’s rights. You can watch it here, or on YouTube.  

Democratic Confederalism, Abdullah Öcalan

The stateless democracy in Rojava is the living result of the ideas of Democratic Confederalism, of women, life, and freedom.

Arab Women in Syria, Inspired by Kurdish Sisters, Join the Fight — and the Movement

“There is no difference between us and them, we are both women. What is really important now is women are having a role.”

The Rojava Revolution: Women’s Liberation as an Answer to the Kurdish Question

The all-female Women’s Protection Units (YPJ) manifest Democratic Confederalism in practice, not only in the battlefield, but in everyday life as well.

The Kurdish woman building a feminist democracy and fighting Isis at the same time

The leader of the most revolutionary women’s rights movement in the world talks about how her ideals have found a home in the middle of the war on ISIS.

"The 5000-year-old history of civilization is essentially the history of the enslavement of woman. Consequently, woman’s freedom will only be achieved by waging a struggle against the foundations of this ruling system." -Abdullah Öcalan

The YPJ - Women's Protection Units

The Yekineyen Parastina Jin (YPJ), or Women's Protection Units, were founded in 2013. They have since played key roles in all of Rojava's major battles against ISIS, from the heroic resistance of Kobani to the liberation of Raqqa.

While they fight alongside the YPG, they are an all-woman force with their own autonomous structures. Kurdish, Arab, Assyrian, and internationalist women all serve together.

The YPJ fights for a democratic Syria, for the freedom of the Kurdish people, and for the liberation of all women from all forms of violence and oppression.

The Kurds

The Kurds are the largest stateless ethnic group on Earth. The home of the Kurds, Kurdistan, is the mountainous region that crosses the borders of present-day south-eastern Turkey, northern Iraq, western Iran, and northern Syria; each called Bakur, Bashur, Rojhilat, and Rojava, the Kurdish words for north, south, east, and west.

The Kurds have been persecuted and oppressed under all four nation-states that claim the land under their feet for generations. Kurds have been subjected to genocide, brutal repression, denied autonomy, and even the freedom to be Kurdish, to speak the language or practice Kurdish culture.

Out of the liberation movement in Bakur, the lessons from struggle since 1979 grew into Democratic Confederalism and women's revolution, now practiced in Rojava.

Women in The Movement

Women have been involved in the Kurdish liberation movement since its earliest stages. Some have been fighters, politicians, or activists. Others passed their language and culture on to their children in secret, or sought justice for family members killed by the states that occupy Kurdish regions.

Today, the movement is based on the ideology of Abdullah Ocalan, who says that: "If I am to be a freedom fighter, I cannot just ignore this: Woman’s revolution is a revolution within a revolution." Women's liberation is considered to be essential to the liberation of the Kurdish people, the Middle East, and the world.

In Rojava, this manifests through women's participation in the YPJ, civilian community defense forces, political institutions, cultural organizations, economic associations, and other venues. From fighting ISIS on the battlefield to providing shelter to victims of domestic violence in women's' houses, women have taken on many necessary roles. The movement has developed jineolojî, or women's science, to theorize and analyze the history, present, and future of women, their place in society, and their struggle towards liberation. With the Rojava Revolution, women have been able to develop and heighten their resistance.

Şopdarên Rojê ypj ypg

What is the YPJ?

October 31, 2018

Who are the women of the YPJ? How was the YPJ formed? What does it fight for? Learn the answers to these questions and more in this short documentary by the YPG Press Office.  

Şopdarên Rojê YPJ YPG

Şoreşa Jin

October 30, 2018

Şoreşa Jin is a short documentary that shows how women in Rojava have organized their own communities to institutionalize women’s rights. You can watch it here, or on YouTube.  

Şopdarên Rojê ypj ypg

Democratic Confederalism, Abdullah Öcalan

August 24, 2018

The stateless democracy in Rojava is the living result of the ideas of Democratic Confederalism, of women, life, and freedom.

Şopdarên Rojê YPJ YPG

Arab Women in Syria, Inspired by Kurdish Sisters, Join the Fight — and the Movement

August 24, 2018

“There is no difference between us and them, we are both women. What is really important now is women are having a role.”

Şopdarên Rojê ypj ypg

The Rojava Revolution: Women’s Liberation as an Answer to the Kurdish Question

August 12, 2018

The all-female Women’s Protection Units (YPJ) manifest Democratic Confederalism in practice, not only in the battlefield, but in everyday life as well.

Şopdarên Rojê ypj ypg

The Kurdish woman building a feminist democracy and fighting Isis at the same time

August 12, 2018

The leader of the most revolutionary women’s rights movement in the world talks about how her ideals have found a home in the middle of the war on ISIS.

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